Gov't sounds alarm on antibiotic-resistant bacteria - 21 News Now, More Local News for Youngstown, Ohio -

Gov't sounds alarm on antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Updated:
  • More NewsMore>>

  • Catholic school teacher layoffs hinge on enrollment

    Catholic school teacher layoffs hinge on enrollment

    Teachers in the Lumen Christi school system are waiting to learn if they will return to their classrooms in the fall.This is the first year six valley schools are united under the Lumen Christi Catholic School System, which began as plan to streamline resources and grow the schools. It consists of St. Patrick, St. Nicholas, St. Joseph and Immaculate Heart of Mary, St. Christine, St. Charles and St. Luke. Both Holy Family and St. Christine also offer early childhood programs t...More >>
    Teachers in the Lumen Christi school system are waiting to learn if they will return to their classrooms in the fall.This is the first year six valley schools are united under the Lumen Christi Catholic School System, which began as plan to streamline resources and grow the schools. It consists of St. Patrick, St. Nicholas, St. Joseph and Immaculate Heart of Mary, St. Christine, St. Charles and St. Luke. Both Holy Family and St. Christine also offer early childhood programs t...More >>
  • Former Trumbull County special deputy jailed in Youngstown

    Former Trumbull County special deputy jailed in Youngstown

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 11:21 PM EDT2014-04-23 03:21:39 GMT
    Gregory OakesGregory Oakes
    A former Trumbull County special deputyhas been booked into the Mahoning County jail for allegedly running a private security business without a valid license.Eight misdemeanor counts were filed in Youngstown Municipal Court on on Tuesday against 51-year-old Gregory Oakes of Warren.Oakes pleaded not guilty to three similar charges filed in Warren Municipal Court on Tuesday.Earlier this month, Oakes pleaded not guilty to multiple charges of forgery and tampering with records following his indi...More >>
    A former Trumbull County special deputyhas been booked into the Mahoning County jail for allegedly running a private security business without a valid license.Eight misdemeanor counts were filed in Youngstown Municipal Court on on Tuesday against 51-year-old Gregory Oakes of Warren.Oakes pleaded not guilty to three similar charges filed in Warren Municipal Court on Tuesday.Earlier this month, Oakes pleaded not guilty to multiple charges of forgery and tampering with records following his indi...More >>
  • Tressel one of three finalists for Akron University president

    Tressel one of three finalists for Akron University president

    The University of Akron has narrowed the field of candidates for president to three names, including former Ohio State and Youngstown State football coach Jim Tressel, who is also one of 38 people who have applied for the vacancy of YSU president.U of A Trustees issued a statement on Tuesday naming the three finalists, who up until now were on a list of fifteen candidates for the Akron job.The finalists are:Ronald A. Nykiel, Ph.D. Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at the Universi...More >>
    The University of Akron has narrowed the field of candidates for president to three names, including former Ohio State and Youngstown State football coach Jim Tressel, who is also one of 38 people who have applied for the vacancy of YSU president.U of A Trustees issued a statement on Tuesday naming the three finalists, who up until now were on a list of fifteen candidates for the Akron job.The finalists are:Ronald A. Nykiel, Ph.D. Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at the Universi...More >>

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- More than 2 million people come down with infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria every year in the United States, leading to at least 23,000 deaths, according to a report released Monday by federal health officials.

The report marks the first time that the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has performed a comprehensive analysis of the impact on society from antibiotic-resistant bacteria, said Dr. Steve Solomon, director of the agency's Office of Antimicrobial Resistance.

"This is scary stuff, and we want people to know about it," he said.

The report outlines how antibiotic resistance occurs in patients and spreads through the community. It also lists medical procedures that have become more dangerous because of these bacteria. Those procedures include dialysis, chemotherapy, complex surgery and organ transplants.

Antibiotic overuse is the single most important factor leading to antibiotic resistance, according to the report. Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs, but as many as half of those prescriptions are either not needed or not the best course of treatment for the patient, the report said.

"Patients need to understand that antibiotics are not the solution for every illness," Solomon said. "It's important that people not take antibiotics when they aren't necessary. It contributes to resistance, and it also has consequences to the patient in the form of side effects."

The CDC also faulted the use of antibiotics in food animals to prevent, control and treat disease, and to promote their growth. "The use of antibiotics for promoting growth is not necessary, and the practice should be phased out," the report stated.

The centerpiece of the CDC report is a threat-level assessment for 18 bacteria- and antibiotic-related illnesses, broken down into three categories: urgent, serious and concerning.

Three antibiotic-related illnesses are ranked as urgent threats demanding immediate attention:

- Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, are a family of bacteria that have developed remarkable drug resistance in recent years. Half the people who get bloodstream infections from CRE die. About 9,300 hospital infections of CRE occur each year. "A lot of those bacteria are becoming resistant to every antibiotic we have," Solomon said of CRE. "We are very concerned about significant spread over the next few years."

- Neisseria gonorrhoeae -- the bacteria that causes gonorrhea -- are showing signs of resistance to the cephalosporin family of antibiotics. The CDC estimated that about one-third of the 820,000 annual gonorrhea infections involve strains that have become antibiotic-resistant. "The cephalosporins are really the last line of defense we have against gonorrhea," Solomon said. "It has shown its ability to become resistant to every antibiotic we throw at it. If we lost those -- if this cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea spreads -- that disease is going to be untreatable."

- Clostridium difficile is bacteria that, although not antibiotic resistant, poses an urgent threat because it causes diarrhea linked to at least 250,000 hospitalizations and 14,000 American deaths each year. C. difficile infections occur because of antibiotic use that destroys the good bacteria in people's bodies that protect against illness. "Because there has not been as much success in addressing the problem of antibiotic overuse, we are flagging that as an urgent problem because it has to be brought under control," Solomon said.

Twelve infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria are listed as serious, and three as concerning. For each bacteria threat, the CDC offers guidance for what healthcare industry officials, medical professionals and the general public can do to limit its spread.

Infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria add as much as $20 billion in excess direct health-care costs, with additional costs for lost productivity as high as $35 billion a year, according to the report.

In its report, the CDC outlined a four-pronged strategy for combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria:

- Preventing infections and preventing the spread of resistance.

- Tracking resistant bacteria.

- Improving the use of existing antibiotics.

- Promoting the development of new antibiotics and new diagnostic tests for resistant bacteria.

"As different as these problems are, the same strategies to address them are shared in common," Solomon said. "By helping people understand that those four core strategies are shared among the ways we address all of these antibiotic-resistant bacteria, we put it all in context and provide a glimpse of the big picture."

Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, said he appreciates the report's frank, down-to-earth manner.

"[The report] gives us a handle. Something we can use to talk with the public," he said. "Obviously, there is an enormous risk to the health of the public by antibiotic resistance, and it's going to take a multiple-sector response to resolving it."

More information

For more information on antibiotic-resistant bacteria, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
  • More From wfmj.comMore>>

  • Jet stowaway undetected for hours before departure

    Jet stowaway undetected for hours before departure

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 11:44 PM EDT2014-04-23 03:44:25 GMT
    Surveillance cameras at San Jose International Airport successfully captured the teenager on the tarmac, climbing up the landing gear of a jet. But in the end, the cameras failed because no one noticed the security...More >>
    A 15-year-old stowaway who survived a flight over the Pacific in a jet's wheel well spent seven hours undetected in what is supposed to be a highly secure area of San Jose International Airport before the flight...More >>
  • Ohio teen on trial for alleged rape at school

    Ohio teen on trial for alleged rape at school

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 12:59 PM EDT2014-04-22 16:59:11 GMT
    (AP) - A high school student is standing trial in northeast Ohio for allegedly raping a classmate in the locker room. Prosecutors argued during the first day of the trial in Cuyahoga (KY-uh-HOH'-guh) County Monday that the boy, then 16, carried the girl into the locker room at Shaker Heights High School and raped her. An attorney for the now 17-year-old boy - who is charged with rape and kidnapping - argued that the two had consensual sex. The Northeast Ohio Media Group reports tha...More >>
    (AP) - A high school student is standing trial in northeast Ohio for allegedly raping a classmate in the locker room. Prosecutors argued during the first day of the trial in Cuyahoga (KY-uh-HOH'-guh) County Monday that the boy, then 16, carried the girl into the locker room at Shaker Heights High School and raped her. An attorney for the now 17-year-old boy - who is charged with rape and kidnapping - argued that the two had consensual sex. The Northeast Ohio Media Group reports tha...More >>
  • Ohio symposium focuses on homeless youth

    Ohio symposium focuses on homeless youth

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 12:43 PM EDT2014-04-22 16:43:14 GMT

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - A meeting of minds is focusing on youth homelessness in Ohio.

    More >>

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - A meeting of minds is focusing on youth homelessness in Ohio.

    More >>
  • Hot ClicksHot ClicksMore>>

  • Can an app save the planet?

    Can an app save the planet?

    This startup's Earth Day launch has a massive goal: Cut carbon emissions globally. It has its work cut out for it.
    More >>
    This startup's Earth Day launch has a massive goal: Cut carbon emissions globally. It has its work cut out for it.
    More >>
  • 'Captain America' holds onto top box office spot

    'Captain America' holds onto top box office spot

    Monday, April 21 2014 10:47 PM EDT2014-04-22 02:47:39 GMT
    LOS ANGELES (AP) - Captain America really is unbeatable - at least at the box office"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" has been the top draw at theaters for three consecutive weeks, vanquishing would-be foes including the new thriller starring Johnny Depp.According to Monday's final box office figures, the Marvel sequel added $25.6 million in ticket sales over the weekend. "The Winter Soldier" has made more than $200 million domestically since logging the best April opening in history."Hea...More >>
    LOS ANGELES (AP) - Captain America really is unbeatable - at least at the box office"Captain America: The Winter Soldier" has been the top draw at theaters for three consecutive weeks, vanquishing would-be foes including the new thriller starring Johnny Depp.According to Monday's final box office figures, the Marvel sequel added $25.6 million in ticket sales over the weekend. "The Winter Soldier" has made more than $200 million domestically since logging the best April opening in history."Hea...More >>
  • Netflix poised to raise prices after strong 1Q

    Netflix poised to raise prices after strong 1Q

    Monday, April 21 2014 10:37 PM EDT2014-04-22 02:37:26 GMT
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Netflix is preparing a sequel unlikely to be a hit with its subscribers. The Internet video service is about to raise its prices for the first time in three years to help pay for more Internet video programming such as its popular political drama "House of Cards."The increase, to take place sometime before July, will hike prices by $1 or $2 per month for new customers. The company's nearly 36 million current subscribers will continue to pay $8 per month for at least the n...More >>
    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Netflix is preparing a sequel unlikely to be a hit with its subscribers. The Internet video service is about to raise its prices for the first time in three years to help pay for more Internet video programming such as its popular political drama "House of Cards."The increase, to take place sometime before July, will hike prices by $1 or $2 per month for new customers. The company's nearly 36 million current subscribers will continue to pay $8 per month for at least the n...More >>
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and WFMJ. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms