No harm done from 'scoop and run' police transport policy - 21 News Now, More Local News for Youngstown, Ohio -

No harm done from 'scoop and run' police transport policy

Updated: Jan 5, 2014 08:54 AM
© iStockphoto / Thinkstock © iStockphoto / Thinkstock
  • More NewsMore>>

  • Themes for WaterFire Sharon announced

    Themes for WaterFire Sharon announced

    SHARON, Pa. - WaterFire Sharon will return this summer to the Shenango River. The three big events will have several themes.  The theme on July 19th will be "Elements", August 23rd's theme will be "Origins"More >>
    SHARON, Pa. - WaterFire Sharon will return this summer to the Shenango River. The three big events will have several themes.  The theme on July 19th will be "Elements", August 23rd's theme will be "Origins"More >>
  • Hundreds expected to help with clean up of Dave Grohl Alley

    Hundreds expected to help with clean up of Dave Grohl Alley

    WARREN, Ohio - Hundreds are expected to show up in Warren on Saturday to take part in clean-up effort, after a vandal was caught on camera damaging a tribute to a Warren-born musician.From noon until 4More >>
    WARREN, Ohio - Hundreds are expected to show up in Warren on Saturday to take part in a clean-up effort, after a vandal was caught on camera damaging a tribute to a Warren-born musician.More >>
  • Motorists reminded of more Amish buggies on the roads

    Motorists reminded of more Amish buggies on the roads

    LISBON, Ohio - Orange barrels won't be the only thing motorists will have to watch for while traveling throughout Columbiana County.  Vehicles are often using the same lanes as Amish buggies and localMore >>
    LISBON, Ohio - Orange barrels won't be the only thing motorists will have to watch for while traveling throughout Columbiana County.More >>

SATURDAY, Jan. 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests it may not make much difference to survival if victims of gunshots and stabbing injuries are transported to the emergency department in a police car or by emergency medical services (EMS).

The study sheds light on the "scoop and run" approach to such injuries, which emphasizes getting a patient to the hospital quickly, even in a police car, instead of making a higher priority of treating the patient on the way through emergency medical services.

"It is critically important to remember that our study focuses on a very specific type of patient with a specific disease process in a densely populated urban environment," senior study author Dr. Brendan Carr, assistant professor of emergency medicine and biostatistics and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, said in a university news release.

"We in no way are suggesting that patients with serious medical symptoms, such as chest pain or difficulty breathing, do anything but call 911 and await the highly trained EMS personnel who have the skill and equipment to deal with the situation and any potential problems," Carr explained.

The study -- published online Jan. 2 in Annals of Emergency Medicine -- tracked more than 4,100 patients treated in emergency rooms in Philadelphia from 2003 through 2007. Almost 3,000 were transported by emergency medical services and more than 1,100 by police officers. More than three-quarters suffered gunshot wounds, while the others were stabbed.

Overall, 27 percent of the patients died, with the risk slightly higher than that for those transported by the police and slightly less for those who got an assist from emergency medical workers. But the difference seems related to the fact that the cops tend to transport patients with more severe wounds.

Gunshot patients with the most severe wounds were more likely to survive if police took them to the hospital. "There could be many factors contributing to this finding, such as the fact that police may have shorter response times to an event simply by virtue of how they patrol," lead author Dr. Roger Band, assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, said in the news release.

The Philadelphia police department's policy calls for police personnel to transport people suffering from a serious penetrating wound, such as that from a gun or knife, to the nearest accredited trauma center. "Transportation will not be delayed to await the arrival of the Fire Department paramedics," the policy states.

"This study is an examination of current prehospital practices with an eye toward improving patient care and is by no means intended as a criticism of the highly trained and dedicated professionals of the Philadelphia Fire Department who provide outstanding care under difficult circumstances," said Band.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has details on traumatic injuries.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
  • Around the WebMore>>

  • Ohio teacher fired over comment on black president

    Ohio teacher fired over comment on black president

    CINCINNATI (AP) - An Ohio teacher has been fired following allegations that he told a black student who said he wanted to become president that the nation didn't need another black president.The Cincinnati Enquirer reports (http://cin.ci/1kIkFmQ ) the Fairfield Board of Education voted 4-0 on Thursday to fire science teacher Gil Voigt.Voigt didn't immediately return a call for comment Friday but has said the student misquoted him.Voigt, who is white, says what he actually told the teen was th...More >>
    CINCINNATI (AP) - An Ohio teacher has been fired following allegations that he told a black student who said he wanted to become president that the nation didn't need another black president.The Cincinnati Enquirer reports (http://cin.ci/1kIkFmQ ) the Fairfield Board of Education voted 4-0 on Thursday to fire science teacher Gil Voigt.Voigt didn't immediately return a call for comment Friday but has said the student misquoted him.Voigt, who is white, says what he actually told the teen was th...More >>
  • 13-1/2 pound boy born at southeastern Pa. hospital

    13-1/2 pound boy born at southeastern Pa. hospital

    Saturday, April 19 2014 8:54 PM EDT2014-04-20 00:54:06 GMT
    DREXEL HILL, Pa. (AP) - A woman has given birth to a more than 13-pound baby at a southeastern Pennsylvania hospital.Officials at Delaware County Memorial Hospital say Brian and Danielle Dwyer's son born Monday is the largest baby they can recall there.Waldo James Mysterious Dwyer tipped the scales at 13 pounds, 8-1/2 ounces.The couple loved the "Where's Waldo?" books as children, so that's where they got their son's first name.Brian Dwyer said the middle name Mysterious is because Waldo was ...More >>
    DREXEL HILL, Pa. (AP) - A woman has given birth to a more than 13-pound baby at a southeastern Pennsylvania hospital.Officials at Delaware County Memorial Hospital say Brian and Danielle Dwyer's son born Monday is the largest baby they can recall there.Waldo James Mysterious Dwyer tipped the scales at 13 pounds, 8-1/2 ounces.The couple loved the "Where's Waldo?" books as children, so that's where they got their son's first name.Brian Dwyer said the middle name Mysterious is because Waldo was ...More >>
  • Teen suspended for asking Miss America to prom

    Teen suspended for asking Miss America to prom

    Saturday, April 19 2014 8:44 PM EDT2014-04-20 00:44:23 GMT
    YORK, Pa. (AP) - A Pennsylvania high school student is in hot water for asking Miss America to prom during a question and answer session at school.Eighteen-year-old Patrick Farves said he received three days of in-school suspension Thursday because he asked Nina Davuluri to prom.The senior at Central York High School stood up and popped the prom question, then walked to the stage with a plastic flower. Davuluri just laughed and the students cheered.School officials heard about Farves' plan in...More >>
    YORK, Pa. (AP) - A Pennsylvania high school student is in hot water for asking Miss America to prom during a question and answer session at school.Eighteen-year-old Patrick Farves said he received three days of in-school suspension Thursday because he asked Nina Davuluri to prom.The senior at Central York High School stood up and popped the prom question, then walked to the stage with a plastic flower. Davuluri just laughed and the students cheered.School officials heard about Farves' plan in...More >>
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and WFMJ. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms