Research finds interracial marriage uncommon in Youngstown area - WFMJ.com News weather sports for Youngstown-Warren Ohio

Research finds interracial marriage uncommon in Youngstown area

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Interracial marriage is a relative rarity in the Youngstown-Warren area according to analysis of U.S. Census Bureau Data conducted by the Pew Research Center.

The Valley ranks 124th out of 126 metropolitan areas when it comes to intermarriage, according to Pew Research.

An analysis of data from 2011 to 2015, among people who were married in the 12 months prior to being surveyed, determined that 4% of Valley newlyweds are married to someone of a different race or ethnicity.

For purposes of the research, intermarriage refers to marriages between a Hispanic and a non-Hispanic, or marriages between non-Hispanic spouses who come from the following different racial groups: white, black, Asian, American Indian, multiracial or some other race.

Pew Researchers found that nationwide, one-in-six newlyweds (17%) were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity in 2015.

This represents a more than five fold increase from 3% in 1967, the year in which the Supreme Court ruled in the Loving v. Virginia decision that interracial marriages were legal.

While intermarriage is generally more common in metropolitan areas than in more rural non-metro areas, researchers found tremendous variation within metro areas in the shares of newlyweds who have a spouse of a different race or ethnicity.

Honolulu has by far the highest share of intermarried newlyweds of any metro area analyzed. Forty-two percent of newlyweds living in and around that city were married to someone of a different race or ethnicity.

The same is true of about three-in-ten newlyweds living Metro areas where intermarriage is most and least common near Las Vegas, Nevada, or Santa Barbara, California.

These areas are all relatively diverse in terms of race and ethnicity, and this diversity likely contributes to the high intermarriage rates by creating a diverse pool of potential spouses.

In Honolulu, for instance, the “marriage market” is made up of 42% Asians, 20% non-Hispanic whites and 9% Hispanics. In the Las Vegas area, 46% of people in the marriage market are non-Hispanic white, while 27% are Hispanic, 14% are nonHispanic black and 9% are Asian; and around Santa Barbara, 52% of people in the marriage market are non-Hispanic white and 37% are Hispanic.

Fayetteville, North Carolina, and the area around Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Florida, have high intermarriage rates as well.

These areas are characterized by less diversity than their Western counterparts. However, the fact that both are located near military bases likely contributes to the high rates of intermarriage, since intermarriage is typically more common among people in the military than among civilians.

At the other end of the spectrum, about 3% of newlyweds in Jackson, Mississippi, and Asheville, North Carolina, are married to someone of a different race or ethnicity.

The same is true of 5% of newlyweds around Chattanooga, Tennessee, and 6% of those around Greenville, South Carolina, and Birmingham, Alabama.

Intermarriage is relatively uncommon in the Youngstown area as well.

Some of these metro areas include marriage markets with relatively little racial and ethnic diversity, which likely contributes to the relatively low rates of intermarriage. In Asheville, for instance, 85% of the pool of potential spouses is white, and the same is true of Youngstown, where 79% of the marriage market is comprised of whites and another 15% is comprised of blacks.

However, the same does not hold true in Jackson or Birmingham. The marriage markets around those cities are fairly diverse: In Jackson, the pool of potential spouses is comprised of 61% nonHispanic blacks and 36% non-Hispanic whites; in Birmingham, the marriage market is comprised of 57% non-Hispanic whites and 37% non-Hispanic blacks.

One factor that contributes to the low intermarriage rates in these areas may be the lower acceptance of interracial marriage.

Some 13% of adults in the South say that more interracial marriage is a bad thing for society, and 11% of those living in the Midwest, where Youngstown is located, say the same.

By comparison, smaller shares in the West (4%) and the Northeast (5%) say that more interracial marriage is a bad thing for society.

The Pew Research Center website describes the organization as a nonpartisan fact tank that informs the public about the issues, attitudes and trends shaping America and the world.

They conduct public opinion polling, demographic research, content analysis and other data-driven social science research. They do not take policy positions, according to the website.

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