Ohio upgrades opioid prescription tracking technology - WFMJ.com News weather sports for Youngstown-Warren Ohio

Ohio upgrades opioid prescription tracking technology

Posted: Updated:

The Ohio Board of Pharmacy has announced upgrades to a technology that allows pharmacists to pinpoint and prevent certain opioid addiction practices. 

The new technology will enhance the automated reported system, known as the Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS), which allows prescribers and pharmacists to cross-check patients with opioid prescriptions. 

The upgrade will now provide advanced analytics and tools to promote patient safety and assist in clinical decision-making. 

There are several new key features, including scores that calculate a patient's possible risk of overdose and addiction, red flags to alert prescribers of a potential patient safety issue, interactive visualization of prescription data, a messaging option to communicate with other healthcare providers and the ability to search for local addiction treatment providers. 

"Through this upgrade, Ohio becomes the first state in the nation to offer this powerful analytics tool statewide," said State of Ohio Board of Pharmacy Executive Director Steven W. Schierholt. "This is another step in our commitment to utilize data in OARRS to better inform patient care."

The new platform will be made available at no cost to all Ohio healthcare providers accessing OARRS via electronic health records and through the OARRS website in November. 

"Ohio has been a national leader in tracking the dispensing of prescription drugs to patients," said Ohio Department of Medicaid Medical Director Dr. Mary Applegate. "This upgraded drug monitoring platform will offer critical information to Ohio clinicians to help them provide better and safer treatment for their patients."
 

  • More NewsMore>>

  • Niles police: Man holds grandfather hostage for drug money

    Niles police: Man holds grandfather hostage for drug money

    Tuesday, January 16 2018 9:52 PM EST2018-01-17 02:52:31 GMT

    A Niles man is facing several charges after police said he held his grandfather hostage at his home on Dakota Avenue Friday afternoon. 

    More >>

    A Niles man is facing several charges after police said he held his grandfather hostage at his home on Dakota Avenue Friday afternoon. 

    More >>
  • Transformer leaks oil-like substance at Newton Township trailer park

    Transformer leaks oil-like substance at Newton Township trailer park

    Tuesday, January 16 2018 8:17 PM EST2018-01-17 01:17:31 GMT
    An alert meter reader in Trumbull County helped contain a First Energy transformer leaking an oil-like substance, which was discovered to be mineral oil, according to Trumbull County dispatchers.  The incident happened around 11:30 am Tuesday on Queens Dr. at the Blue Water Manor Trailer Park in Newton Township.  First Energy crews were called and have since contained the leak, which was spread out over 15 to 30 feet. Trumbull dispatchers said this was so clean up crews c...More >>
    An alert meter reader in Trumbull County helped contain a First Energy transformer leaking an oil-like substance, which was discovered to be mineral oil, according to Trumbull County dispatchers.  The incident happened around 11:30 am Tuesday on Queens Dr. at the Blue Water Manor Trailer Park in Newton Township.  First Energy crews were called and have since contained the leak, which was spread out over 15 to 30 feet. Trumbull dispatchers said this was so clean up crews c...More >>
  • Property owners urged to clear buried fire hydrants

    Property owners urged to clear buried fire hydrants

    Tuesday, January 16 2018 7:22 PM EST2018-01-17 00:22:39 GMT

    Due to the heavy snow, local fire departments are asking property owners for help in digging out  buried fire hydrants. It's becoming a problem in communities all around the valley, and if you have a buried hydrant on your property it's your responsibility to dig it out. "You need to shovel a pathway to the fire hydrant and then three feet around the hydrant so you have room to work to make that connection," said Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer. A buried hydrant...

    More >>

    Due to the heavy snow, local fire departments are asking property owners for help in digging out  buried fire hydrants. It's becoming a problem in communities all around the valley, and if you have a buried hydrant on your property it's your responsibility to dig it out. "You need to shovel a pathway to the fire hydrant and then three feet around the hydrant so you have room to work to make that connection," said Boardman Fire Chief Mark Pitzer. A buried hydrant...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2018 WFMJ. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms