Valley representative and presidential candidate Tim Ryan is asking where is President Trump now after news broke the tentative agreement between GM and the UAW would close the Lordstown plant. 

"President Trump came to Youngstown and told us not to sell our homes – but where is he now," he said in a statement.

His statement comes after the UAW GM Council voted on Thursday to recommend the tentative agreement with General Motors be ratified. 

Ryan said that GM has been a part of the community for over half a century, and generations of Northeast Ohioans have worked at the Lordstown plant.

"After nearly a year of urging CEO Mary Barra to bring a new product to the plant, GM has turned its back on the very people who worked to make this company what it is today – the same people who bailed GM out when they were on the verge of bankruptcy."

According to Ryan, he's been in contact with UAW officials and has stood with workers on the picket line at the Lordstown plant and others. 

"While I support bringing an end to this strike and getting our workers back on the job, it's a sad day in the Valley. I will continue to fight to make the best of a tragic situation by getting Lordstown back up and running with a new occupant to bring high-paying jobs to Northeast Ohio."

Local union officials say they will remain on strike until the contract is ratified. A meeting is set to go over the ratification on Saturday.

Ryan's full statement can be read below. 

"GM has been a part of our community for over half a century. Generations of Northeast Ohioans have worked at the Lordstown plant, and every person in our community has a connection to GM Lordstown. It's why today's decision from GM to leave the community is so devastating and reopens wounds from their first announcement in November 2018. After nearly a year of urging CEO Mary Barra to bring a new product to the plant, GM has turned its back on the very people who worked to make this company what it is today—the same people who bailed GM out when they were on the verge of bankruptcy. President Trump came to Youngstown and told us not to sell our homes – but where is he now? Throughout the strike and negotiations, I've been in close contact with UAW officials and have stood with workers on the picket-line in Lordstown and at plants across the Midwest. While I support bringing an end to this strike and getting our workers back on the job, it's a sad day in the Valley. I will continue to fight to make the best of a tragic situation by getting Lordstown back up and running with a new occupant to bring high-paying jobs to Northeast Ohio."