Cost of Lumber expected to rise in wake of Hurricane Sandy - WFMJ.com News weather sports for Youngstown-Warren Ohio

Cost of Lumber expected to rise in wake of Hurricane Sandy

Updated:

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio - In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, consumers may see a spike in the cost of lumber, at least temporarily.

The price of lumber is up as residents in the northeast evaluate the devastation caused by Sandy.

According the Associated Press, lumber marked for a January delivery rose $10 on Wednesday based on expectations that demand will also pick up following the need to rebuild and repair; a process that could take months.

"It's going to take a lot of material to rebuild that area down there," said Mathew Baird of Baird Brothers Sawmill, Inc. in Canfield.

Baird said they deliver daily to the northeast region of the country, and while he doesn't expect to see an immediate upswing in demand, he does expect to see one.

"I do think that those general commodities such as ply wood and SPF softwoods and yellow pine, I do think you will see an uptick in that," Baird said.

That's an uptick local companies may already be planning for, according to the Home Builders Association of Youngstown.

The average cost of a common building material known as oriented strand board runs between $4 and $7 during the winter months. At an area Home Depot the cost is currently $11.47, up $1 since Tuesday. At Lowe's the cost is $10.49.

"Every time they name a hurricane in the Caribbean you will see minor spikes in material prices," said Bill Clipse, Treasurer of the HBA. "As far as lumber and stuff is concerned, you'll see a minor spike in prices and then the industry will be back to normal."

The reason, Clipse believes, is because the lumber industry has been suffering for so many years, hit hard by the recession. And although a disaster may temporarily spike the cost, ultimately the housing demand just isn't there.

  • Hot ClicksHot ClicksMore>>

  • Can fines rein in Big Tech? Privacy regulators spur a debate

    Can fines rein in Big Tech? Privacy regulators spur a debate

    Friday, May 10 2019 3:12 AM EDT2019-05-10 07:12:49 GMT
    (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File). FILE - This Jan. 28, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Trade Commission building in Washington. Federal privacy regulators are under scrutiny in Congress as they negotiate a record fine with Facebook to punish the compa...(AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File). FILE - This Jan. 28, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Trade Commission building in Washington. Federal privacy regulators are under scrutiny in Congress as they negotiate a record fine with Facebook to punish the compa...
    (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File). FILE - This Jan. 28, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Trade Commission building in Washington. Federal privacy regulators are under scrutiny in Congress as they negotiate a record fine with Facebook to punish the compa...(AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File). FILE - This Jan. 28, 2015, file photo, shows the Federal Trade Commission building in Washington. Federal privacy regulators are under scrutiny in Congress as they negotiate a record fine with Facebook to punish the compa...
    Federal privacy regulators are under scrutiny in Congress as they negotiate a record fine with Facebook to punish the company for alleged violations of its users' privacy.More >>
    Federal privacy regulators are under scrutiny in Congress as they negotiate a record fine with Facebook to punish the company for alleged violations of its users' privacy.More >>
  • Google's privacy push gets a mixed reception

    Google's privacy push gets a mixed reception

    Thursday, May 9 2019 9:53 PM EDT2019-05-10 01:53:12 GMT
    (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu). Google's Alexander Hunter gives a demonstration of the Nest Hub Max at the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif., Tuesday, May 7, 2019.(AP Photo/Jeff Chiu). Google's Alexander Hunter gives a demonstration of the Nest Hub Max at the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif., Tuesday, May 7, 2019.
    (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu). Google's Alexander Hunter gives a demonstration of the Nest Hub Max at the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif., Tuesday, May 7, 2019.(AP Photo/Jeff Chiu). Google's Alexander Hunter gives a demonstration of the Nest Hub Max at the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif., Tuesday, May 7, 2019.
    Google CEO Sundar Pichai kicked off the company's annual developer conference Tuesday with new privacy tools and updates to Google's artificially intelligent voice assistant.More >>
    Google CEO Sundar Pichai kicked off the company's annual developer conference Tuesday with new privacy tools and updates to Google's artificially intelligent voice assistant.More >>
  • Auschwitz Museum protests death camp images on skirts, bags

    Auschwitz Museum protests death camp images on skirts, bags

    Thursday, May 9 2019 2:21 AM EDT2019-05-09 06:21:01 GMT
    Museum authorities at the Auschwitz-Birkenau former Nazi German death camp in Poland have protested to an online vendor that was selling miniskirts, pillows and other items bearing photos of the camp.More >>
    Museum authorities at the Auschwitz-Birkenau former Nazi German death camp in Poland have protested to an online vendor that was selling miniskirts, pillows and other items bearing photos of the camp.More >>
Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2019 WFMJ. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms