Ohio Attorney General sues Austintown home improvement contracto - WFMJ.com News weather sports for Youngstown-Warren Ohio

Customers say they lost $40,000

Ohio Attorney General sues Austintown home improvement contractor

Posted: Updated:
YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio -

The Ohio Attorney General's office is suing a now-closed, Austintown-based home improvement contractor for allegedly performing substandard work for some customers, and failing to deliver on promised services to others.

The lawsuit, claiming that Anthony J. Luttrell and Falcon General Contractors LLC violated Ohio’s Consumer Sales Practices Act, is based on complaints from seven of Luttrell's former customers who say they lost $40,000.

According to the lawsuit, Luttrell operated Falcon General Contractors from 5547 Mahoning Ave., Suite 335, in Austintown before closing it.

The lawsuit alleges that Luttrell offered large home improvement projects, such as house additions, room renovations, and porch or deck installations.

Consumers complained that they paid Falcon for work that was never completed and that their money was not returned.

The lawsuit, filed in the Mahoning County Common Pleas Court, seeks reimbursement for consumers and an injunction to prevent further violations.

To help consumers avoid home improvement problems, Attorney General Michael DeWine offered the following recommendations:

Research a company before making any payments.

Ask for recommendations, and talk to past customers about their experiences. Search for complaints on file with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office or Better Business Bureau. Find out if the business is registered with the Ohio Secretary of State. Conduct an internet search with the name of the business and words like “reviews” or “complaints.” Be skeptical if you find no information. Some operators change business names regularly to make it harder for consumers to detect their record of shoddy work.

Get multiple estimates.

For a large job, consider contacting at least three different businesses before making a final selection. Keep in mind that the company that gives you the lowest estimate may not necessarily deliver the best results.

Check your cancellation rights.

If a home improvement contractor does not have a fixed place of business or comes to your door to offer services, you may be entitled to a three-day right to cancel the contract under Ohio’s Home Solicitation Sales Act. Make sure you receive detailed written information about your cancellation rights.

Make sure verbal promises are put in writing.

Get a detailed written contract including any verbal claims the contractor makes and other important details, such as the estimated cost of the work, the expected start and end dates, and the names of the individuals who will perform the services.

Be wary of requests for large down payments.

It’s reasonable for a contractor to require a down payment, but be skeptical if you’re asked to make a large down payment (such as half or more of the total cost) before any work begins. If possible, pay in increments as the work is completed.

Consumers who suspect an unfair or deceptive sales practice should contact the Ohio Attorney General’s Office at www.OhioProtects.org or 800-282-0515.

A copy of the lawsuit is available on the Ohio Attorney General’s website.

A copy of the lawsuit is available here

?

  • More NewsMore>>

  • The Latest: US lawmaker says UK bomb showed 'sophistication'

    The Latest: US lawmaker says UK bomb showed 'sophistication'

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 7:14 PM EDT2017-05-24 23:14:53 GMT
    France's interior minister says that the suicide bomber who targeted Manchester is believed to have traveled to Syria and had "proven" links with the Islamic State group.More >>
    France's interior minister says that the suicide bomber who targeted Manchester is believed to have traveled to Syria and had "proven" links with the Islamic State group.More >>
  • Opioid epidemic: Can it be stopped at the source?

    Heroin epidemic: Can it be stopped at the source?

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 7:06 PM EDT2017-05-24 23:06:08 GMT

    Fighting the opioid crisis head-on remains a challenge as the overdose death rate continues to climb across the valley. Hidden websites and online options offering opioids, including fentanyl for sale, are making it difficult to stop the suppliers. "In some cases people would order it like they would a pizza and have it delivered to them, it's just that easy to get," Keith Martin said, assistant special agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration Cleveland Offic...

    More >>

    Fighting the opioid crisis head-on remains a challenge as the overdose death rate continues to climb across the valley. Hidden websites and online options offering opioids, including fentanyl for sale, are making it difficult to stop the suppliers. "In some cases people would order it like they would a pizza and have it delivered to them, it's just that easy to get," Keith Martin said, assistant special agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration Cleveland Offic...

    More >>
  • South Dakota girl with cancer prevented from graduating

    South Dakota girl with cancer prevented from graduating

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 6:49 PM EDT2017-05-24 22:49:40 GMT
    A western South Dakota high school won't let a student who has brain cancer to walk at graduation because she's six credits short of being able to graduate.More >>
    A western South Dakota high school won't let a student who has brain cancer to walk at graduation because she's six credits short of being able to graduate.More >>
Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2017 WFMJ. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms