Ohio senators introduce bill to ban assault rifles - WFMJ.com News weather sports for Youngstown-Warren Ohio

Ohio senators introduce bill to ban assault rifles

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COLUMBUS, Ohio -

Two Ohio State Senators have put forward legislation in light of recent school shootings and threats. 

Senator Michael Skindell (D–Lakewood) and Senator Charleta B. Tavares (D-Columbus) introduced Senate Bill 260, which looks to establish an assault weapons ban throughout the state of Ohio.  

The legislation specifically would make it a felony of the fifth degree for possessing or acquiring an assault weapon. 

Under the bill, an "assault weapon" is an automatic firearm or semi-automatic firearm capable of accepting a detachable magazine with the capacity of accepting ten or more cartridges and a semi-automatic firearm with a fixed magazine with the capacity of accepting ten or more cartridges. 

The legislation would also require the Office of the Ohio Attorney General to manage a registration database to issue permits for the purchase of firearms and track the purchase of firearms and ammunition. 

In addition, it would require Ohio retailers to report all sales of firearms and ammunition to the Attorney General.

"The recent, sorrowful events in Florida and Nevada and so many more places teach us why it is important to ban weapons that are meant for waging war," said Senator Skindell. "While we cannot stop every act of suffering inflicted upon the public, it is our responsibility to limit access to these assault weapons. Until better national standards are enacted to regulate the sale of these dangerous assault weapons, Ohio should have its own regulations to protect the public."

"Assault weapons were designed to be used by trained members of the military to kill people. These weapons, unfortunately, are killing innocent children and adults by people who want to murder, maim,  and terrorize large masses of people in public spaces," stated Senator Tavares. 

According to a release from the Senators, assault weapons were banned from 1994 until 2004, during which the number of attacks and deaths went down. 
 

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