Mary Taylor calls opioid epidemic 'personal' as she announces ru - WFMJ.com News weather sports for Youngstown-Warren Ohio

Mary Taylor calls opioid epidemic 'personal' as she announces run for Governor

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Ohio Lt. Governor Mary Taylor Ohio Lt. Governor Mary Taylor
CLEVELAND, Ohio -

Framing herself as a long-time supporter of conservative issues, and reacting personally to the rising opioid epidemic, Ohio Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor announced she is seeking the Republican nomination for Governor.

In her speech delivered before the City Club of Cleveland on Friday, Taylor said that confronting the epidemic is personal for her because it has touched her family.

In June, Taylor told the Dayton Daily News that her two sons have struggled with opioid addiction for five years, which has included failed drug rehab programs and overdoses.

“I have known the sorrow that drug addiction causes,” said Taylor “I’m angry – angry at what drug addiction does, the dreams it destroys, and the lives it takes. I’m determined – determined to fight for the lives of Ohioans from every region, race and economic circumstance who find themselves ensnared in this addiction”

Taylor called on the federal government to step in and stop cultivation and production in Asian poppy fields, target cartels and secure the border with Mexico.

Possibly taking aim at fellow Republican gubernatorial candidate and Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine, Taylor said, “Hiring a personal injury attorney and filing a lawsuit against a drug company will not solve the problem.

DeWine announced in May that the state has filed suit against some drug makers, accusing them of helping to heighten the opioid epidemic.

The New York Times reported that the law firm of Labaton Sucharow has been advising states on possible opioid litigation.

The Lt. Governor is calling for what she characterized as a comprehensive, fully-integrated drug control strategy that makes use of law enforcement, treatment, education, faith initiatives, public service campaigns, and border interdiction.

Taylor began her announcement by asserting that the state is shedding its Rust Belt image, saying that Ohio has dug itself out a hole during the administration of fellow Republican Governor John Kasich.

But Taylor said more needs to be done with reforming business regulations, making the tax system less complicated, helping Ohioans find work and making sure businesses have the trained workers they need.

Taylor called on her experience as a Certified Public Accountant, Ohio Insurance Director, State Representative, and Lt. Governor as qualifications to become Governor.

Saying that conservatives believe in what she called the inherent dignity of work, Taylor promised to focus on small businesses in the state.

She criticized what she said was the acceptance of multi-generational poverty.

“There is a place for safety net programs to keep a family’s house warm in the winter and food in the fridge during lean times. But government is not a long-term solution to any problem,” said Taylor, adding that creating more jobs is the answer.

Calling America's regulatory system out of control, Taylor said that reform is needed to restore jobs.

In 2011, Gov. Kasich appointed Taylor to head-up Ohio’s Common Sense Initiative, an effort to find out from businesses which regulations are hampering their growth.

Taylor promised to build on reforms started by the Common Sense Initiative.

The candidate isn't giving up on Ohio's charter schools, many of which have come under criticism for failing to deliver on promises to offer a viable alternative to the public school system.

“We will reset our charter school system as accountable centers of innovation that provide true choice and true benefit to Ohio families not satisfied with their existing options,” said Taylor. “We will ensure Ohioans develop skills which lead to jobs which lead to family security and prosperity.”

Taylor concluded by saying she has stuck with sometimes unpopular conservative principles.

In a nearly Trump-like assertion, Taylor said she is the one candidate who will challenge the system.

In addition to DeWine, Taylor joins Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted and Congressman Jim Renacci on the list of those seeking the GOP gubernatorial nomination.

Five Democrats have declared their intention to become governor, including Valley favorite son, Ohio Senator Joe Schiavoni.

A transcript of  Lt. Governor Taylor's announcement may be read here.

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